Writing From Factor X

January 29, 2012

Paneling Versus Coming Out: Thoughts On Presentation

Filed under: Carnival of Aces,Visibility — Sciatrix @ 11:19 pm
Tags: , , , ,

This post was originally written for the Carnival of Aces. This month’s theme is “Re/presentation.” 

As it happens, one of the things I’ve been doing while I’ve been on posting hiatus recently is doing Q&A panels with my local LGBTQA campus group. (I have posted recaps of some of them in other places.) Recently, I’ve been thinking about the differences in the way that I present myself when I’m speaking on a panel as a representative of aces and the way I present myself when I’m just coming out to someone I think needs to know I, specifically, am ace.

For one thing, I’m pretty guarded when I’m coming out. About a year ago I wrote about a concept I called the “unassailable asexual,” in which I argued that there was pressure (especially internalized pressure) on aces doing visibility work to present themselves in a way that opened as few avenues to attack on their sexuality as possible.

I still think that that internal pressure is a bad thing that discourages some people from doing visibility work, but it’s not something that I spend that much time personally resisting, either. Particularly when I out myself, I often take care to omit anything that might be construed as an invitation to doubt my orientation. I’m actually a lot more willing to talk about some of the ways in which I fit the ways that people usually attempt to invalidate asexuals  in panels than I am when I come out.

I think this may be because I’m typically much more relaxed when I’m paneling  than I am when I’m coming out to someone. There are several reasons for this. First, when I’m paneling I’m sitting as an invited authority next to two to three other representatives of other groups from my LGBTQA organization. Often I’m paneling for a class of some sort, in which case the instructor has often warned their students to be polite beforehand (and in one case, had apparently briefed their class roughly on asexuality before I ever walked into the room!). In contrast, when I have to come out, I don’t have any more psychological authority than the other person does, which means that people are less likely to acknowledge that I know what I’m talking about, even when it comes to my own sexuality.

I also feel more comfortable when I’m giving panels because it’s understood, when I panel, that I’m speaking as an individual representative for a larger group of people who share an identity, not just for myself. The very fact that I’m sitting on a panel states that I’m not speaking and answering questions purely for myself but for a larger category of people whom I belong to. It’s easier to avoid invalidation when the discussion becomes not a question of whether you personally are deluded/lying/ill but a question of whether a large group of people could all be correct about themselves. 

Panels are easier for me, too, because (paradoxically) the point is to be as open and forthright about everything as possible. I often find that I have a hard time figuring out where the social line between “silent and vaguely uncomfortable on all aspects of discussion of sexuality” and “cheerfully breaking out odd facts about animal reproduction as well as interesting aspects of human sexuality” lies. The fact that I have no personal experience with romantic relationships or romantic and sexual attraction usually doesn’t help. Panels are squarely in the “TMI” category, which makes it much easier for me to deal with the limits of what counts as socially acceptable and what doesn’t. 

There are also certain questions, like the masturbation question, that I am actually personally completely unbothered by answering. However, outside of a panel situation where I have offered ahead of time and signed up to be asked all manner of personal questions, I don’t believe in encouraging people to ask random aces that question or allowing people to demand aces to bare every detail of their personal lives as the price of coming out. I believe that (outside of a situation in which I’ve agreed ahead of time to share), if one person is sharing in a conversation, everyone should expect to have to share the same level of personal information in the conversation. I also find that many people asking aces the masturbation question become extremely uncomfortable if you ask them to share their own personal sexual habits. Given those beliefs, it can be a little difficult for me to handle questions like that in a personal setting. Panels let me answer them and then add a post script on the basic right of privacy for everyone outside of a specialized situation in which people are offering to answer questions. 

There are other differences in the way I behave when I panel and the way I behave when I come out. I am often much friendlier about the whole topic when I’m paneling than I am when I out myself. Part of this comes back to the point I made earlier about feeling safer and more comfortable when I’m paneling, and part of it comes back to the fact that I have found that the more brusque and confident I am when I out myself, the less likely people are to take this as an invitation to attempt to invalidate me. 

I also sometimes out myself in situations when I’m not mentally prepared or particularly willing to answer many questions, and I have found that being not particularly friendly and welcoming about coming out lessens the chance that I will suddenly be expected to give a tour of Planet Asexual without warning. This usually happens when I’m suddenly asked a direct question about my sexual orientation or about my romantic status and I want to clear up the problem, but I don’t have the emotional energy to discuss much further or entertain the inevitable personal questions. 

To give an example of suddenly be expected to educate without warning, I was once hanging out with a group of friends. I had been there for a few hours and was dozing, half asleep and completely relaxed, on my friend’s couch. Suddenly one of my friends, who I was out to, mentioned asexuality to a friend I was not out to as part of some other conversation. The second person was understandably interested and wanted to know more, whereupon the first said “Well, it’s [Sciatrix], you should ask her!” There went my lazy afternoon! Now I was expected to drop everything and play question-and-answer with a person whom I hadn’t actually had any plans to talk to about asexuality in the future, let alone in that particular instant. 

Paneling, by contrast, has a specific schedule and a time limit, and I know exactly when and for how long I’m agreeing to answer questions. Moreover, I’ve agreed to do that ahead of time, so I can’t be surprised by the sudden need to educate, and I can have as much time as I want to prepare for any questions that might come up. The questions are even pretty standard both ways, so I can prepare answers ahead of time if I want. 

I don’t think any of these reactions are particularly ace-specific, but I do find it interesting that I am far, far more comfortable paneling than I am coming out to new people. I hear a lot of people tell me “Oh, I could never do that!” when I mention paneling in ace spaces, but I find that at least for me?

The paneling is way less scary. 

5 Comments »

  1. As a further data point that this isn’t necessarily ace-specific: what you describe has pretty much exactly been my experience with paneling vs. coming out as someone on the autistic spectrum. I, too, am paradoxically far more comfortable with the former than the latter. (In my own case, I think this is a combination of the history of not-usually-positive reactions I’ve gotten when I come out in a non-panel context, and the audience being generally more clueful about the topic in the context of a panel.)

    Comment by codeman38 — January 29, 2012 @ 11:53 pm | Reply

    • That does not actually surprise me in the least! And yeah, reactions to outing myself as autistic are–well, they tend to actually be pretty awful, since apparently I pass well enough to be told I couldn’t possibly be autistic but not well enough to avoid constant comparisons to Sheldon Cooper, Glaring Autism Stereotype. Serious eyerolling, here.

      It also does not surprise me that any audience that shows up to a panel of adult autistic people to listen to what they have to say is probably going to be a lot more clueful than the general population! In my panels, I’m usually sitting in front of a class whose professor has decided to ask my LGBTQA group for a panel to address them, or sometimes a dorm group whose dorm has organized the event. Once I got to panel for a Unitarian youth group, which was pretty cool, but usually I’m talking to a more or less average cross-section of people on a college campus.

      Comment by Sciatrix — January 30, 2012 @ 7:54 am | Reply

  2. This is very true! I’ve done panels about asexuality (and one about the autistic spectrum), and it’s much easier than person-to-person. At least for me, because it doesn’t feel as personal…you’re not putting yourself “out there” emotionally in the same way. I’ve felt awkward and uncomfortable on panels, but there’s not the danger that I could lose a friend if they end up harboring some extreme anti-asexual beliefs.

    Comment by Ily — January 30, 2012 @ 5:43 pm | Reply

    • I think that’s it exactly. When I give workshops and that sort of thing, if it doesn’t go well then at the end of it I can just say bye to everyone and that’ll be that. If instead it goes well, as it always has so far, the outcome in one way is actually pretty similar: I won’t see most of the people there again. If I’m talking to friends or family though, the consequences of what I say and how I say it will be much more enduring in my own life. This means that it can be much easier to talk to strangers about this sort of thing!

      Comment by Heorrenda — February 1, 2012 @ 1:19 am | Reply

  3. […] Sciatrix writes about why it can be much easier to talk on a panel about asexuality than it can be to talk to friends about it. […]

    Pingback by Carnival of Aces: Roundup « quod inane vocamus — February 3, 2012 @ 7:25 pm | Reply


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